Grand Journal of Urology
ISSN : 2757-7163

Articles in Press
Clinical Image
Genitourinary Radiology, Online First: 31 March 2021
Grand J Urol 2021; DOI: 10.5222/GJU.2021.09797
Case Report
Inguinal bladder herniation is seen in 1% -4% of all inguinal hernia cases; most of them are asymptomatic and come up with swelling in the groin. In symptomatic cases, nonspecific findings such as lower urinary tract symptoms or pain due to strangulation of the hernia sac are seen. Two-stage micturition (manual pressure to the scrotum to empty residual urine) is a pathognomonic sign for the advanced case. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), bilateral hydronephrosis, urinary tract infection, acute kidney failure and bladder wall necrosis are complications that may be seen if the problem is not appropriately managed. Preoperative diagnosis rates are low (
Urological Oncology, Online First: 09 June 2021
Grand J Urol 2021; DOI: 10.5222/GJU.2021.22931
Primary or secondary lymphoma of the prostate is a rare condition. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) represent 4-9% of all lymphomas. Prostate involvement with MCL is very rare, with only 11 reported cases up to now. Here we present a case with lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) elevation diagnosed with MCL of the prostate. Prostate biopsy was performed in a 70-year-old patient due to increased PSA. After the pathology result was reported as prostatic MCL, imaging studies and sampling of additional pathological specimens were performed for staging. An improvement was observed in the urinary system complaints of the patient who started chemotherapy regimen. While prostatectomy was performed in some of the prostatic MCL cases reported previously, in some, no additional treatment was required after chemotherapy. Our case is the only prostatic MCL case with elevated PSA levels, but did not receive the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Physicians should keep in mind that, prostatic MCL can present with nonspecific symptoms. Staging should be performed in patients whose histopathologic diagnosis is lymphoma of the prostate so as to determine appropriate treatment options.
General Urology, Online First: 14 June 2021
Grand J Urol 2021; DOI: 10.5222/GJU.2021.79188
One of the reasons for the high mortality in COVID-19 patients is the increased risk of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and venous thromboembolism. For this reason, the use of anticoagulant treatments has become widespread. One of the rare complications of anticoagulant therapy is retroperitoneal hemorrhage. These hemorrhagies require immediate intervention. Retroperitoneal hemorrhage should be kept in mind among the many complications that develop in the patient who was followed up during the pandemic period. For this purpose, we present 2 cases who developed spontaneous retroperitoneal bleeding while clinically recovering under COVID-19 treatment.
Review Article
Urological Oncology, Online First: 19 April 2021
Grand J Urol 2021; DOI: 10.5222/GJU.2021.87598
Focal ablation therapies in prostate cancer have been actively evaluated in the light of recent literature. According to published data,focal ablation therapies appear to be well tolerated and have an acceptable side effect profile. Moreover, while clinical outcomes were not homogenous, short-term oncological results of some focal ablation therapies such as laser and irreversible electroporation (IRE) have been found as good as curative ones. While waiting long-term oncological results, focal ablation therapies in prostate cancer are beinmg used increasingly.
Original Article
Female Urology, Online First: 07 June 2021
Grand J Urol 2021; DOI: 10.5222/GJU.2021.03511
Objective: We aimed to evaluate the results of our minimally invasive (laparoscopic and robotic) sacrocolpopexy operations in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Materials and Methods: Demographic characteristics, intraoperative and postoperative data of 15 patients for whom we applied laparoscopic or robotic sacrocolpopexy due to symptomatic Grade 2 or higher apical POP based on POP-Q classification between September 2014 and September 2018. Treatment success was defined as Grade 0 or 1 POP in POP examination in the final surveillance. Results: Mean age of the patients was 60.4 ± 8.3 (49-82) years. Four patients (26.7%) were operated using robotic and eleven patients (73.3%) using laparoscopic methods. Uterus conservative surgery was applied in all patients excluding one. Mean operative time was 183.3 ± 21.4 (145-220) minutes and mean hospital stay of the patients was 2.8 ± 0.7 (2-4) days. Intraoperative and postoperative complications developed in a total of two patients (13.3%). Mean duration of follow-up was calculated as 12.1 ± 4.8 (8-24) months. De novo urgency urinary incontinence developed in two patients and stress incontinence in one patient. Based on the physical examination in the follow-ups, 14 patients (93.3%) had Grade 0 and one patient had (6.7%) asymptomatic Grade 2 anterior POP. Conclusion: Minimally invasive sacrocolpopexy is an efficient and safe surgical option for prolapse repair in symptomatic advanced stage POP cases.